What Can We Know About God by R.C. Sproul

Book: 
What Can We Know About God
R.C. Sproul
Image: 
Reviewer: 
Joseph J. Adrian

Religion and Theology-—What is the distinction between these two studies? Religion is man-made and usually has to do with, ". . . the worship practices of human beings in particular environments." Theology is concerned with "The Study Of God." Religion is natural and theology is supernatural (above nature). One thing that most people will (or at least should) concede is that God is incomprehensible. God is infinite and we are not, so we cannot possibly have a comprehensive knowledge of God.

A Fourfold Salvation by A.W. PInk

Book: 
A Fourfold Salvation
A.W. PInk
Image: 
Reviewer: 
Joseph J. Adrian

When does salvation begin in the experience of the Believer? Some in the present day and in past centuries as well, have asserted that it begins with the Believer's justification (when faith in Christ is exercised). This cannot stand biblical scrutiny. It must be, so Pink correctly contends, at regeneration (when God begins the work of saving His People from “The Pleasure of Sin”). It is when a person is “Born Again,” that they now have a nature that hates evil and loves holiness. Why must regeneration precede believing faith?

Only One Way of Salvation ... by J.C. Ryle

Book: 
Only One Way of Salvation...
J.C. Ryle
Image: 
Reviewer: 
Joseph J. Adrian

The 19th century Anglican Minister, J.C. Ryle, whose writings continue to have considerable influence in our day, opens the text Acts 4:12 "Neither is there salvation in any other; for there is none other name under heaven given among men, whereby we must be saved." This is one of the numerous clear statements in the New Testament that assert that Christ is the only way of salvation. Is Christ set forth as "The Only Way" in the Old Testament as well? Absolutely! Not in plain outright statements as in The New Testament but in type and shadow.

God's Way Of Holiness by Horatius Bonar

Book: 
God's Way Of Holiness
Horatius Bonar
Image: 
Reviewer: 
Joseph J. Adrian

All those who are "Believing in Christ" are called to "A New Life," a life of holiness——". . . life wrought out of death, by the death of "The Prince Of Life." "God spared not 'His Only Son' and uses His power, wisdom, and love to rescue us from the dominion of sin and make us partakers of this new life——no longer under law but now under grace. Are we given a new mind, new intellect, a new body? No. They are the same yet, . . . the old man is slain, the new man lives." A Christian now thinks differently of himself because his mind has been renewed by the Spirit of God.

Drawing Near To God My Portion Forever

Book: 
Drawing Near To God My Portion Forever by Thomas Boston et al
Thomas Boston et al
Image: 
Reviewer: 
Joseph J. Adrian

For anyone who is in Christ, their chief desire should be "To Draw Near To Their God." The language of their heart ought to echo that of the Psalmist——"Whom have I in heaven but thee? and there is none upon earth that I desire besides thee!" John Calvin hit the bullseye in his Institutes when he set forth man's two greatest priorities in life——to know God and know yourself.

The Christian's Duty To Forsake All For Jesus Christ

Book: 
The Christian's Duty To Forsake All For Jesus Christ
Thomas Mocket
Image: 
Reviewer: 
Joseph J. Adrian

In The Christian's Duty To Forsake All For Jesus Christ, Puritan Pastor, Thomas Mockett, launches a nuclear attack against an error that has permeated God's Church (dressed in different garb) throughout the centuries. One of the disguises in our day (designed to destroy men's souls) is the teaching that Christ can be your Savior but submission to Him as Lord is up to you, it is not a necessity. If Mockett is correct, then the disciples of Christ must be willing to forsake all for Him. I'm sure he stands on an unshakeable biblical foundation.

How Should We Eye Eternity That It May Have It's Due Influence Upon Us? by Thomas Doolittle

Book: 
How Should We Eye Eternity That It May Have It's Due Influence Upon Us?
Thomas Doolittle
Image: 
Reviewer: 
Joseph J. Adrian

How does "The Eye Of Faith" view eternal realities? "Faith so looks at things that are far off, that they have a kind of mental intellectual existence; though absent, as if they were present; being promised. As sure as if they were already possessed."

A principle that Thomas Doolittle gives us is, "Let unseen, eternal things be the first that you look at." Thus "unseen things" should have the priority of our thoughts, care, and diligent endeavors. . . ." If we are wise, we will be determined to prioritize "seeking the Kingdom of God."

The Excellent Name Of God by Jeremiah Burroughs

Book: 
The Excellent Name Of God
Jeremiah Burroughs
Image: 
Reviewer: 
Joseph J. Adrian

Jeremiah Burroughs was one of the eminent Westminster Divines. He was very influential in his day and many of his books are still in print. This recent publication by Puritan Publications consists of several sermons on Psalm 148:13 "Let them praise the name of the LORD for His name alone is excellent, His glory is above the earth and heaven."

The Duty Of Reformation In The Light Of God's Mercies by Thomas Gouge

Book: 
The Duty Of Reformation In The Light Of God's Mercies
Thomas Gouge
Image: 
Reviewer: 
Joseph J. Adrian

How important is the holiness of His people to our Sovereign Lord? What are the most effectual means (revealing God's great wisdom) to bring about this desired end? Thomas Gouge, in this extraordinary work on Reformation, asserts that God's delivering mercies has this end in view——"The design of God in delivering a people from eminent dangers of ruin, is to oblige them to forsake all sinful and wicked practices." Believer's should increasingly desire to do God's will, to honor Him in all things, to intensely desire to live for His glory, to conform all of their ways to His holy word.

Remembering Your Creator by Matthew Mead

Book: 
Remembering Your Creator
Matthew Mead
Image: 
Reviewer: 
Joseph J. Adrian

Matthew Mead——the popular Puritan Preacher——begins his exposition of Ecclesiastes 12:1 by isolating the two great duties of the Christian life, ". . . to cease to do evil and to learn to do well." This 17th-century Minister of the Gospel has this great insight (that should seem obvious, yet I found it to be profound): "A man cannot be considered good that does not cease to do evil." No believer successfully ceases to do evil altogether. If that were possible, then sinless perfection would be attainable in this life, but it is not.

Syndicate content